katagrapho

writing things down…

Open question and appeal to bloggers who review books

Do you link to the publishers website or to Amazon (or other internet retailers)?   It is in everybody’s best interest to point readers to the publishers’ sites.  Purchasing from the publisher helps them and the authors.  Plus, we publishers are more apt to send more review copies your way if you will send more readers our way.

While I’m at it, go here to find good books at good deals.

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7 Comments»

  Noah wrote @

I usually send to amazon or wts, because of their affiliate programs. Do the author’s / publishers benefit more if the books are purchased directly? Wouldn’t you rather increase your sales through your channels?

  Chris Tilling wrote @

A worthwhile appeal!
I link to the publishers. Always. I figure they want their webpages visitsed, otherwise why invest time and money and personel into designing and maintaining them.

  Noah wrote @

I should add that I typically add the name of the publisher to my reviews in the book info at the top, and I link the publisher’s name to their website, so in retrospect I actually do both! Although the links to the retail sites are more prominent.

As a blog reader, I actually appreciate the links to retail sites more, because I have never purchased a book directly from a publisher. I would rather have one click access to the site where I actually purchase the book. I’d rather not create accounts for every publisher out there, and the prices direct from the publisher are typically higher, if not much higher (retail).

  Chris wrote @

Thanks, Noah and Chris. I feel compelled to respond to some of Noah’s comments and questions, but I think that the issue is more than what link one provides in a book review. There is something bigger here. I will try to skirt around the larger conversation for now.

“Do the author’s / publishers benefit more if the books are purchased directly?”
Yes, most of the time. Publishers are often required to offer books at deep discounts to the massive retailers, so that the massive retailers can offer them to the customers at reasonable prices. For instance, the publisher might sell to the likes of Amazon at 40% off retail, so Amazon can sell to the customers at 20% off retail and pocket the difference. If publishers sell to the customer directly, they can sell at the same 20% off retail but make more off of the sell than they would through Amazon. And, if the authors’ contracts are based on net profits, the sale through the publisher benefits them as well.

“Wouldn’t you rather increase your sales through your channels?”
Sure, that’s why our books are on Amazon. But, my appeal was to those who have opportunity to direct readers to the publishers. The reviewer’s link to Amazon has little to do with the increased sales through them. If a reviewer directs 10 people to Amazon, those are 10 people who could just as easily have been directed to the publisher. Amazon helps increase sales for the general browser/book buyer, not the readers of reviews on blogs.

“I would rather have one click access to the site where I actually purchase the book. I’d rather not create accounts for every publisher out there,”
This is the bigger issue I am referring to. I will simply say, this perspective is what I call the “Wal-Mart” approach to book shopping. It is based on the ease and convenience of one-stop shopping rather than the relationality that comes with shopping with the publishers. Most publishers actually care about the product and the author and all of the people that had a part in editing, designing, printing, etc. It is more than a bottom-line issue.

“and the prices direct from the publisher are typically higher, if not much higher (retail).”
This is simply not true; at least not for W&S. See for instance the following price comparison for Christianity, Democracy, and the Radical Ordinary:
W&S website: $31.20
Amazon: $32.30

  liquidoxology wrote @

I admit that I link to Amazon, but I will think about linking to the publisher in the future. Thanks for the admonition.

  Noah wrote @

Thanks for your responses. I have some of my own, but I don’t want to hijack this post, so I’ll wait until you address the ‘bigger issue’, if you choose to in another post!

  Review of Cousar’s NT Introduction « katagrapho wrote @

[…] I tried to follow my own suggestion and provide a link to the publisher’s website. However, I could not find the book on the […]


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